Social Care & Budget Issues in The USA

Entitlements, Medicaid, and regulations may be hindering the budget

When it comes to social care in the USA, it seems that there is always a focus on three main components. These are Entitlements, Medicaid, and regulations. While there may be, some attention given to Social Securities, this generally falls into the entitlement category. And while congress men and women and analysists may try to figure out a way to balance social care budgets and social services, the bottom line is that there are certain issues which should be addressed if the budget is ever to be fixed. Here are a few.

The depletion of funding to non-responsible families

Welfare payments, according to an article in Forbes, has put the receivers within the top 20% of all income earners. Granted, it is far lower than the average US worker’s annual revenue, but the fact remains that the $168 or $25 (depending upon whose side you take in the argument) accounts for a great deal of money collectively. And while I have no qualms with the needy family who uses programs to get a hand-up, I have a big problem with those which seek a hand-out.

Social Care

Currently, the welfare system is written to where a mother with 6 kids currently, and not pregnant, can go on having children and receiving increased benefits. While some may say that it is the woman’s right to procreate as much as she wills, I would venture to say that should a family have existing children which they cannot support, it should not be upon the social care funding to provide additional assistance should that family decide to expand further. So a simple solution to that budget issue would be this. If you have welfare for a family of 8 and you go about having children, you still only get benefits for the family of 8. Dominic Bowkett

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SSI and disability needs regulation

While there has been a bit of restructuring to the SSI and disability funds in the US, the system remains grossly broken. According to the Social Security February 2017 report, the total monthly benefits in millions is 76,412 with the average monthly benefits equaling $1,249.55. Yes, there should be benefits allotted to the elderly and to veterans who cannot work. Yet, the scope of the definition of being disabled has been expounded to such great lengths, that the average bodied worker can claim such for one broken finger. It is true that a broken finger can cause discomfort, and that such takes time to heal. However, even with an amputated finger, a person is able to work (as there are 9 other digits). I am reminded of what Bill O’Reilly Stated when talking about work and addressing those who do not “It’s hard to do it because you gotta look people in the eye and tell ‘em they’re irresponsible and lazy. And who’s gonna wanna do that? Because that’s what poverty is, ladies and gentlemen. In this country, you can succeed if you get educated and work hard. Period. Period.”

budget issues

The problem, as with welfare, is that the system allows for too much to be given to too many. The budget issue is that there is 76 million dollars allotted to SSI persons per month. Coupled with the nearly 15 thousand that a single person can make a year, it is no wonder that there has been an increase in those trying to receive it. The solution? Screen applicants more strenuously. Only those which have physical and serious mental illnesses which would hinder work should get the benefits. The budget should allow less to be allotted per month to encourage the average man to work for his supper rather than have it catered to him. Dominic Bowkett

No ceiling means no responsibility

Perhaps the biggest issue with Social Care and the budget in the US is that there does not seem to be a ceiling on the funding. Every time there has arose an issue with the budget, specifically when the government’s total budget has threatened to shut down our government, instead of working out a solution which would help everyone out fiscally, the ceiling of our debt is increased. This is not a solution but feeding a beast which will continue to get bigger. If the allocation of funds continues to rise, but the vault which contains such funds continues to be depleted, those who are receiving social care funding will find that an unexpected and immediate grinding halt will occur in the future. Much like a person cannot expect to get a credit card and spend funds without maxing out their limits, so should be the mentality of the social care budget.

The Solution to Social Care Budgeting in the US

The bottom line is that governmental parties need to be more responsible with the funds that they issue to persons. Those who receive funds who have shown that they are not responsible enough to live with assistance should not get it. Period. Those which can work should be required to do so, and when there is no more money to give out, stop. Only then will the budget get balanced and we may see an increase instead of a depletion of funds in the social care sector. Dominic Bowkett

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